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My red headed pens, a couple probably brunettes.

I’ve been using a fountain pen for quite a while as a user and haven’t really lost any, except maybe during my high school days when we didn’t care about our school stuff. I know I’ve lost a couple and dropped another couple of Parker fountain pens in the 70’s when in high school. Come 1980, forced to maturity in a coed premed, a Parker 75 flighter with a fine nib and a black Jotter (recessed clicker button and brass bushing) would see me through premed, medicine proper, internship and general surgery residency in the 90’s. Because I trained in a Government hospital which gave a higher salary, I was entitled to a separation pay after 5 years of surgical training. So in 98, I would use the separation pay to gift myself with my first Rolex and a Black Sheaffer Connaisseur. The smarter ones kept the funds to see them through a starting surgeons life.

I would lose the Sheaffer in the OR (operating room) dressing room in 99. I would then buy a Pelikan M600 at a DFS and later on a Sailor 1911 in Singapore. Since losing the Connaisseur, I’ve been both careful and lucky. Through the years, the pen collection has grown with nary a pen accidentally leaving the flock…until that fateful Monday evening January 23, 2017.

I got home after having dinner with the family at UP Town Center. I removed the 149 and the Duofold Rollerball from my shirt pocket and returned them to their space in a Somes 3 pen case. When I returned the Somes in its place in a Tumi Alpha 2 Organizer Travel Tote, the leather sheath containing a favorite Bexley was missing. I ran my hands through the Tumi, emptied it, turned the bag upside down and inside out but it was missing. Checked all my pockets again and again, still missing. Ran to the car and searched every space, every nook and cranny but it was nowhere to be found. Took out my torch to check the garage and driveway but nothing. I even checked the toys of the French Bulldog thinking she might’ve picked it up still nothing. I decided to call it a night, took a shower, then steeped a cup of Chamomile and while waiting for it to brew, I retraced my steps of the past day. Morning rounds…administrative duties at a Maritime Health clinic…out patient clinic duties…quick meeting…a Judges Seminar organized by the Judges Development Licensing Committee of the Philippine Canine Club Inc….late dinner with the family. It was the realization that the pen probably fell during a moment when I went down the car that made me sigh, a sigh of sadness because it probably is now in someone else’s hands.

The pen, as previously mentioned is a Bexley, a reissue of the Prometheus, this one in raspberry ebonite with a recently bought fine gold Bexley nib. It has been a favorite for the past 7 months because it made me appreciate fine nibs. The photo is my humble collection of red pens, from L-R. A Sheaffer Balance in Carmine Red Fine Gold Nib, Parker Mark I Duofold Centennial Burgundy Medium Nib, Montblanc 146 Bordeaux Medium Nib, and the missing Bexley Prometheus Raspberry Red Ebonite Fine Gold Nib, Visconti Wall Street LE Burgundy 1.3 Stub Palladium Nib. Some have told me “At least it’s just a Bexley.” With me, it never is about the brand, it’s always a case of “I know it when I see it” and when I saw and held the Bexley, I knew it. She had that warmth they say an ebonite pen gives you when you hold it and a guilty pleasure of mine, the industrial smell of ebonite. The fine gold nib instantly turned it into a favorite.

I was using this Bexley than the 149 this past 7 months. I was whipping her out on almost every occasion, till that 23rd of January when I had to dress to impress. So the 149 and the Duofold RB took center stage when I slipped them into the pocket of my Brooks Brothers white long sleeved shirt and the Bexley stayed in the bag. My wife said “Baka nag tampo yung Bexley when she realized she wasn’t good enough (Maybe the Bexley sulked in jealousy…).”  Yeah, she probably did…I’m hoping she will pop up when I least expect it and make my day.

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